Sharon Natoli Boil An Egg Interview

Sharon Natoli Boil An Egg Interview

Sharon Natoli Boil An Egg Interview

Despite being a nation of passionate foodies, Australians haven't quite mastered the art of boiling an egg. New research released today reveals that whilst the majority of Australians (93%) claim to know how to hard-boil an egg, the reality is that only a quarter of us are actually cooking them for the correct amount of time. More than half of Aussies (54%) are mistakenly placing their eggs in simmering or boiling water and 76% aren't cooking their eggs for long enough.

Commissioned by Australian Eggs in the lead up to World Egg Day, the research findings also reveal that 82% of Australians believe that the healthy weekly intake of eggs is less than it actually is, with 81% only eating them one to two days a week. In fact, The Australian Dietary Guidelines maintain that the everyday consumption of eggs can be included as part of a healthy, balanced diet.

'It's not easy to beat a hard-boiled egg in the morning," said Sharon Natoli, APD, Director of Food and Nutrition Australia and member of the Egg Nutrition Council. 'Eggs are a tasty and nutritious solution for breakfast, offering a natural source of 11 different vitamins and minerals as well as high quality protein, omega-3 fats and antioxidants. A hard-boiled egg will last up to seven days in the fridge if in its shell; perfect for weekday breakfasts on the go."

Creative chef and food stylist Kai Ellmann commented, 'Boiling an egg is a basic cooking skill that can be easily mastered once you know the correct steps. Boiled eggs can also be a versatile option for breakfast, from soft boiled with toast soldiers or asparagus, to hard boiled eggs Florentine or simply served with chilli flakes. There are so many great ways to cook your goog, boiling is just the beginning!"

To take the guesswork out of boiling eggs and encourage Aussies to start their day with an egg this World Egg Day on Friday 11 October, Australian Eggs has launched the -Boil an Egg' hotline to help people with their egg-boiling needs.

Australian Egg Hard-Boiling Guidelines

Place a room temperature egg into a small saucepan and cover with cold water
Place a lid on the saucepan and bring the water to a boil over high heat
Once boiling, reduce the heat to medium and gently boil, uncovered and stirring, for 8 minutes

To reach the new toll-free -Boil an Egg' hotline, please call 1800 800 024 and follow the prompts for instructions for how to cook soft, medium and hard-boiled eggs.
For delicious boiled egg recipes and mealtime inspiration, please visit www.eggs.org.au


Interview with Sharon Natoli, APD, Director of Food and Nutrition Australia and member of the Egg Nutrition Council

Question: Are you surprised that Aussies haven't quite mastered the art of boiling an egg?

Sharon Natoli: There are a number of conflicting methods for boiling eggs so it's understandable that Aussies are confused. This World Egg Day, Australian Eggs is setting the record straight so we can all make expertly boiled eggs.


Question: Why is it vital to know how to boiling an egg?

Sharon Natoli: It can be disappointing when your egg doesn't turn out exactly how you anticipated. Knowing the correct method and boiling times for soft, medium and hard-boiled eggs allows you to have perfectly cooked, enjoyable eggs every time. To test your technique you can call the hotline on 1800 800 024.


Question: Why should we start everyday with eggs?

Sharon Natoli: Eggs offer a quick and easy breakfast solution that is packed full of goodness and contains 11 essential vitamins and minerals. Eggs are also proven to keep you feeling fuller for longer to help keep you from unnecessary snacking throughout the day.


Question: Can you provide some ideas of how we can incorporate eggs into our breakfast?

Sharon Natoli: Eggs are delicious, healthy, versatile and simple to prepare. Soft-boiled eggs and soldiers are a favourite Aussie brekkie and it's easy to add an adult twist by switching the traditional toast fingers for seed bread or asparagus. A hard-boiled egg will also last up to seven days in the fridge if in its shell; perfect for weekday breakfasts on the go!


Question: How else can we incorporate eggs into our diet?

Sharon Natoli: It's easy to incorporate eggs into your diet because they are so versatile! Boiled eggs create the perfect sandwich filling, make a great snack as kebabs, work brilliantly in salads or can even be added to curries.

Whether they're boiled, scrambled, poached or baked, the humble egg can be incorporated into any meal throughout the day!


Question: What is the healthy weekly intake of eggs and why is important to stick to this guideline?

Sharon Natoli: The Australian Dietary Guidelines maintain that the everyday consumption of eggs can be included as part of a healthy, balanced diet. Eggs are a highly nutritious food that can make an important contribution to a healthy, well balanced diet. In fact, research shows egg lovers have higher intakes of vitamins A, E, B12 and folate compared to non-egg eaters.


Question: Why do you think eggs have got a bad rap in regards to 'fats"? Bust the myth!

Sharon Natoli: There has been much confusion in recent years about egg consumption, its impact on people's health and the -right' number of eggs to eat. There have also been many myths about the impact of eggs on health and in particular cardiovascular disease and cholesterol.

When it comes to the amount and type of fat in an egg, it's useful to know that one average egg contains just 5 grams of fat, most of which is the healthy unsaturated fat the body needs for normal daily functioning.

In 2005, all eggs produced in Australia received the Heart Foundation's healthy eating Tick of approval. This move was based on scientific evidence showing eggs are a highly nutritious food that can be included in the diet of healthy Australians without increasing their risk of heart disease.


Question: What's your favourite way to eat eggs?

Sharon Natoli: I love scrambled eggs on wholegrain toast – it's my ideal way to start the day!


Question: Can you tell us about your role as a member of the Egg Nutrition Council?

Sharon Natoli: As part of my role, I review scientific research papers, studies and reports on eggs and nutrition from around the world. I then work with the council to help provide advice to Australian Eggs as well as developing position statements on the different aspects of egg nutrition for Australian healthcare professionals.

Our aim at the ENC is to also provide Australians with the most up-to-date dietary information on eggs and demonstrate the positive impact good nutrition can have on your life.


Question: What originally inspired your career?

Sharon Natoli: I want to encourage Aussies to make healthier food choices and reduce the amount of junk food we eat. That's the reason I started my career and continue to do the work I do.


Interview by Brooke Hunter




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