Just Give Me The Pills

Just Give Me The Pills


Koraly Dimitriadis

"Just Give Me The Pills is based on my own experience of the trauma of divorce, and the reality of how difficult it actually is to leave a marriage - I mean, I didn't even suffer any abuse - and it was the most challenging thing I have ever done, and the pain carries on years later, especially when there are children involved. There is a huge lack of support, doctors prescribing antidepressants as a quick fix in the face of cultural and religious pressures to "be normal", and when women actually find the bravery to leave, it's the lack of housing, it's Centrelink making you feel like a criminal - it's the broken family law system. I want to highlight specifically the dangers women face in the claws of lawyers who promise justice when the system is set up to skew in favour of the more financially well off parent, which is most cases is the father because let's face it, care of the children ultimately sits with the mother and this is where they lose their employability. If we want to help women leave unhealthy marriages, we need a structure around them to support that, and we simply as a society do not have that. But in a wider context this book is about women's voices breaking through patriarchy and speaking truths, particularly when all our lives we are taught that marriage is success. I want to empower women who are afraid, to show them there is a way out."

Just Give Me The Pills
Outside The Box Press
Author: Koraly Dimitriadis

Interview with Koraly Dimitriadis

Question: What inspired you to write Just Give Me The Pills?

Koraly Dimitriadis: It was inspired by my experience of getting married very young before I really knew who I was and what I wanted in my life and getting divorced many years later and becoming a single parent. I had always just done what others expected of me, never realsing that I did have my own choices. I believe many women are raised in environments where they are taught that being married and finding a man to look after you is a measure of success. This can be due to cultural or religious expectations. I wanted to write this book to not only help women who are in the same situation I was, but I wanted to communicate with anyone who is struggling to be who they want to be, to inspire them, motivate them, show them there is a way.


Question: What message do you hope readers take from Just Give Me The Pills?

Koraly Dimitriadis: On the one hand I want to give comfort to people who feel like there is something wrong with them. I want to show them "You are normal. Just be you. Don't be afraid. You will find the strength. Humans are reliant. Life is short. Shed your fears." But I also want to show particularly how difficult it is for a woman to leave a marriage and how we need more societal structures to support women leaving marriages, especially when there is abuse involved. Single parents need more financial support, the family law system in Australia needs a re-haul, the stigma of being a single mum needs to be eliminated.


Question: What advice do you have for women who are currently going through a divorce?

Koraly Dimitriadis: Beware of lawyers trying to take advantage of you. At the moment, the family law system is set up to benefit the one with the most money. Take care of yourself. It takes time to heal. Put one foot in front of the other. Cut out people who are judging you and making your life harder, even if that's family. They will come around. Stand your ground. Make new friends if you need to by joining groups. Melbourne Spoken Word Community were my saviour. I wouldn't have made it without them.


Question: What's next, for you?

Koraly Dimitriadis: I am working on my first novel, Divided Island, a love story set in Melbourne and Cyprus that explores how our upbringing affects who we love and how we love. I am also going to do some more travelling overseas and hope to tour my theatre show KORALY: "I say the wrong things all the time" nationally.

Just Give Me The Pills
Outside The Box Press
Author: Koraly Dimitriadis

Photo: Kaliopi Malamas
Interview by Brooke Hunter




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